The Dominican House of Studies

Tuition and Fees

Your key to affordable and enriching education at the Dominican House of Studies. Explore our tuition and fees, affordability, and various financing options.

Tuition

Full Time (per semester) $8,544.00
Part Time (per credit) $712.00
Audit (per credit)  $175.00
Ongoing Registration Fee $150.00

 

Financial Information

Fees

All fees are non-refundable.

Application Fee $150.00
Registration Fee (per semester) $65.00
Library Fee (per semester) $50.00
Security Fee (per semester) $25.00
Parking Fee (per semester) $25.00
Graduation Fee $200.00
Returned Check Fee $35.00

 

Program Tracking Fee (One time fee paid at the beginning of program matriculation) – Calculated according to anticipated number of years of program matriculation. This fee is also non-refundable.

  • One Year $46.00
  • Two Years $77.00
  • Three Years $88.00
  • Four or Five Years $99.00
  • Six Years $110.00
  • Seven Years $121.00

Students needing to renew their tracking due to extending their program pay $46.00 per year.

Tuition and Fees Payment Policy

Tuition and fees are due upon receipt of the invoice. Fall and spring semesters have a grace period of thirty days from the date of invoice. Summer Session is due at registration. The grace period is up to the first day of class. Students are encouraged to pay online using the credit card payment feature or submit a check to the Accounting Office. Students may notify the Accounting Office at *accounting@dhs.edu *via email if they prefer to receive the invoice in pdf format. Otherwise, invoices are placed in the student’s mailboxes located on the second floor. Finance fees [18% per annum] are assessed after the grace period ends and continue until the entire bill is paid in full. Transcripts and other documents will not be released until the student has a zero balance. Students with exigent financial circumstances may request special payment consideration from the Academic Dean.

Check Payments

Checks should be made out to Pontifical Faculty. Please include the specific purpose of the payment in the memo line of the check. Our address is:

Pontifical Faculty of the Immaculate Conception
Accounting Office
487 Michigan Ave., NE
Washington, DC 20017

All foreign checks not underwritten by a U. S. bank are subject to additional conversion fees.

Entrance and Exit Counseling

This is a requirement for students participating in the Federal Financial Aid program. Students are required to complete the entrance and exit counseling online at www.studentloans.gov. Entrance counseling must be completed prior to receiving federal loans. Exit counseling must be completed prior to graduating or withdrawing from school.

Federal Work-Study

FWS provides part-time employment for eligible financial aid students in order to pay for educational expenses.

  • It helps to pay educational expenses.
  • It is available to full-time and part-time students.
  • It is administered by the school (see Director of Federal Financial Aid.).

Grad Plus Loans

  • Applicants must meet the general eligibility requirements for federal student financial aid.
  • Applicants must be graduate or professional degree-seeking students.
  • Applicants must not have an adverse credit history. (Credit checks will be conducted.)
  • The maximum Grad Plus loan an applicant can receive is the cost of attendance minus any other financial aid the student receives for a given academic year.
  • Student loans, unlike grants and work-study, are borrowed and must be repaid-with interest, just like car loans and mortgages. Please consider the probable amount you will have to repay in the future.

How To Apply for Federal Financial Aid

  1. Obtain a PIN (required to process the free online FAFSA) https://www.ed.gov/content/federal-student-aid-pin-1998-2015
  2. Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) form and submit it between January 1 and June 30 for the upcoming academic year. The PFIC academic year begins in August and extends through May. (The FAFSA is sent to the government processors.)
  3. You may check the status of your application three weeks after its submission, either online or by calling Federal Student Aid Information Center at 1-800-433-3243.
  4. After the Department of Education processes your application, you will receive a Student Aid Report (SAR). Review this to make sure all the information is correct. If the information is correct and contains your Expected Family Contribution (EFC) score, contact the Director of Federal Financial Aid. The information will be used to determine your eligibility for federal financial aid funds. An acknowledgement letter will be mailed to the address on file in the SAR. Students must complete the entrance counseling form and the Master Promissory Note (MPN) through www.studentloans.govafter acceptance and registration at DHS.
  5. Sign and return the awards letter and promissory note(s) to the Director of Federal Financial Aid.
  6. You will be notified after registration when your loans are ready for disbursement.

Stafford Loans

Stafford Loans are low interest loans and the most common source of education loan funds. In general, there are two types of Stafford Loans: subsidized and unsubsidized. For graduate study, only unsubsidized loans are available.

  • Students may borrow up to $20,500 in a given academic year.
  • The Borrower is responsible for paying all interest.
  • Interest begins to accrue at the time of disbursement and continues even while the student is enrolled.
  • Borrowers can pay the accumulating interest while in school or allow the interest to capitalize and pay the larger sum later.
  • Unsubsidized Stafford loans are not based on financial need.

Satisfactory Academic Progress

To be eligible for Federal Student Aid (FSA) funds, a student must make satisfactory academic progress, which is assessed by the Academic Dean at the end of each fall and spring term. The discussion below only addresses the standards that a student must meet in order to be eligible for FSA.

Qualitative Standards. By the end of the second academic year of a single or dual degree program (regardless of how many credits the student has accrued), the student must have a C average or its equivalent 2.0 GPA.

Quantitative Standards. In addition to maintaining a minimum 2.0 GPA, to be eligible for FSA a student’s academic progress must indicate that the student will successfully complete his or her degree program in less than 150% of the time or course credit hours for which the program is designed. For example, the M.A. (Theology) program entails 36 credit hours (c.h.) and no less than 2 full-time academic years (4 semesters); to remain eligible for FSA, an M.A. student’s academic progress must clearly indicate that he or she is likely to complete the degree program successfully after having pursued no more than 54 c.h. or 6 full-time semesters. Likewise, M.Div. students pursue a minimum of 105 c.h. for a minimum of 8 full-time semesters; to remain eligible for FSA, their academic progress must continually indicate likely completion of the M.Div. program within no more than 160 attempted c.h. or 12 semesters. The same policy applies to the S.T.B. (minimum 90 c.h. in 6 semesters; maximum 135 c.h. in 9 semesters) and the S.T.L. (min. 36 c.h. in 4 semesters; maximum 54 c.h. in 6 semesters).

Incomplete and Failed Courses. Courses in which a student withdraws and receives a grade of W, WP or WF, or in which an F is received, will not count as having been successfully completed. Courses in which an incomplete grade is given will count as completed work if the Incomplete is removed within the time frame provided in the academic regulations (mid-term of the following semester, or if, in extraordinary circumstances, the Dean grants further exception after which an incomplete becomes a failure. However, no more than four Incompletes can be carried at one time and no incompletes are allowed in the final semester of matriculation.

Losing and Gaining Eligibility A student who loses FSA eligibility for having failed to meet the pertinent satisfactory academic progress standards will regain eligibility when the Academic Dean determines that the student is again meeting those qualitative and quantitative standards. A student may also regain eligibility by successfully appealing a determination of failing to make satisfactory academic progress. For Stafford and PLUS loans, students may regain eligibility for the entire period of enrollment in which they again meet satisfactory academic progress standards.

Withdrawals and the Return of Federal Financial Aid

In the case of student withdrawal or leave of absence during a semester of federal financial aid disbursement, the student may have to return federal financial aid (return to Title IV). The amount of federal aid to be returned is based upon a formula provided by the Department of Education and is independent of the school’s tuition and related fees refund policy. The return of unearned funds are allocated in the following order: (1) Unsubsidized Stafford Loans, (2) Subsidized Stafford Loans, and (3) Grad Plus loans.

The school’s Financial Aid Office is required by federal statute to determine how much financial aid was earned by a student who withdraws, drops out, is dismissed, takes a leave of absence, or drops below half-time prior to completing 60 percent of a payment period or term. For a student who withdraws after the 60 percent point-in-time, there are no unearned funds (no return of funds is necessary). All schools complete a return calculation in order to determine whether the student is eligible for a post-withdrawal disbursement.

The calculation is based on the percentage of earned aid using the following Federal Return of Title IV funds formula: Percentage of payment period or term completed = the number of days completed up to the withdrawal date, divided by the total days in the payment period or term. (Any break of five days or more is not counted as part of the days in the term.) This percentage is also the percentage of earned aid.

Funds are returned to the appropriate federal program based on the percentage of unearned aid using the following formula: Aid to be returned = (100% of the aid that could be disbursed minus the percentage of earned aid) multiplied by the total amount of aid that could have been disbursed during the payment period or term.

If a student earned less aid than was disbursed (see above), both the institution and the student are required to return a portion of the student’s funds to the Department of Education. Keep in mind that when Title IV funds are returned, the student borrower may owe a debit balance to the institution.

If a student earned more aid than was disbursed to him or her, the institution owes the student a post-withdrawal disbursement to be paid within 120 days of the student’s withdrawal. The institution must return the amount of Title IV funds for which it is responsible no later than 45 days after the date of the determination of the date of the student’s withdrawal.

Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund (HEERF)

HEERF Quarterly Report

CARES Act Funding Report 12-30-2021

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